Mt Baker Ski Area To See 4 FEET OF FRESH! | Winter Storm Warning In Effect For Northern Cascades

Mt Baker Ski Area To See 4 FEET OF FRESH! | Winter Storm Warning In Effect For Northern Cascades

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Mt Baker Ski Area To See 4 FEET OF FRESH! | Winter Storm Warning In Effect For Northern Cascades

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Mt Baker Ski Area is currently under a Winter Storm Warning with upwards of 4 feet forecasted by Thursday afternoon reports NOAA.

The storm is slightly warm but expect temperatures to drop as it makes its way out on Friday. Blower conditions could be on tap for first chair Friday.

“We went from a 13 inch snow base last weekend to the deepest snow base in the US in just 7 days Baker style! The good news in the forecast is that snow levels are expected to drop down to 3500 feet today with a possible 4 inches of new expected through the day. A reminder for you backcountry folks: There continues to be nasty persistent weak layer lurking in the snowpack causing very dangerous backcountry conditions. Please educate yourself about this layer – www.nwac.us. We have witnessed wide-spread and significant avalanches this week, and these life threatening conditions in the backcountry continue – yes! even this early in the season.” – Mt Baker Conditions Report

Stevens Pass is currently under a Winter Weather Advisory and is forecasted to see some 38″ of new snow by Thursday afternoon.

Winter Storm Warning

…WINTER STORM WARNING IN EFFECT FROM 6 PM THIS EVENING TO 6 PM PST TUESDAY ABOVE 3500 FEET…

* WHAT…Heavy snow expected above 3500 feet. Total snow accumulations of up to 21 inches expected. Winds gusting as high as 45 mph.

* WHERE…Cascade mountains and valleys of Whatcom and Skagit Counties, including Maple Falls, the Mount Baker Ski Area, Newhalem, Lyman, and Concrete

* WHEN…From 6 PM this evening to 6 PM PST Tuesday.

* ADDITIONAL DETAILS…Travel could be very difficult to impossible from slick and covered roadways as well as diminished visibilities due to the combination of falling snow and wind gusts.

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