Next season feels like a long way away, but Whistler Blackcomb has already started advertising its early bird specials for 2012/2013 passes. Strategies for next Seasons Pass | Cost + Pros and Cons of the Whistler Blackcomb Ski Pass | Unofficial Networks

Strategies for next Seasons Pass | Cost + Pros and Cons of the Whistler Blackcomb Ski Pass

Strategies for next Seasons Pass | Cost + Pros and Cons of the Whistler Blackcomb Ski Pass

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Strategies for next Seasons Pass | Cost + Pros and Cons of the Whistler Blackcomb Ski Pass

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By- Magee Walker

Next season feels like a long way away, but Whistler Blackcomb has already started advertising its early bird specials for 2012/2013 passes. A season in Whistler without a pass is no season at all, and for that reason, I present to you your options for next year’s pass:

The Adult Season Pass

Cost: $1,249 (early bird) plus tax.

Pros: Buy your pass, and you’re good to go! You haven’t broken any rules, you don’t need to do anything else, AND if you get 100 days in, you’re only averaging $12.49 (plus tax) per day.

Cons: WHO HAS $1,249 KICKING AROUND? If you’re living in Whistler, I’m willing to bet you’re not making loads of money. For most of us, this option is a joke or requires some outrageous sacrifices (no food for a few months).

 The Student Pass

Cost: About $500, all-in

Pros: If you are a full-time college or university student between the ages of 17-29 and/or have the student ID and schedule to prove it, you are set! Like the adult pass, once you’ve paid, you’re good to go. The price is MUCH more reasonable for your average skier. If you start saving now (yeah right), your bank account will barely feel the pain come November when it’s time to pay.

Cons: If you opt to get a student pass in a less than legitimate way, you may feel a slight panicky feeling every time a lifty scans your pass. And if you ARE a full-time college or university student, those annoying things called classes might get in the way of your riding time.

Em Pictured here is a Senior Patroller. But, Volunteer positions are available

 The Volunteer Pass

Cost: No money, just your time

Pros: YOU GET TO PLAY ON THE MOUNTAINS FOR FREE! You get to join the elite team of volunteers of Whistler Blackcomb and will get an official jacket to show it. You will meet some nice people and might get to do some pretty cool things (avi dog demos!).

Cons: You’ve got to donate 23 days or so of your time. You typically pick these days ahead of time, so you could very well find yourself patrolling the “slow” sign areas on a pow day. If you miss a day, your pass gets suspended. Responsibility, what’s that.

 Whistler Blackcomb Employee Pass

Cost: Free—they pay you!

Pros: Not only are you not paying a dime to enjoy the mountains, but you are actually getting a wage of sorts from the mountain. The job possibilities are nearly limitless: a busser at Glacier Creek, a lifty, a server at Dusty’s, a marketing office-type… there’s something for everyone!

Cons: You still have to work, and even the ski patrol and events teams can’t play on the alpine on a powder day. But still, you’re probably going to have to work anyways—might as well get a pass for it.

The Cote family of Whistler. Well 3/4 of them

Whistler Blackcomb SIGNIFICANT OTHER PASS

Cost: Free!

Pros: You are coasting if you can manage one of these. If you’ve been dating a Whistler Blackcomb employee for a few years, you could be eligible for one of these puppies. Your boyfriend or girlfriend does the work, you reap the benefits. Sweet setup, bro!

Cons: Hopefully you really like your boyfriend or girlfriend because if the relationship ends, so does your pass. This gives one party a significant advantage in all relationship negotiations.

Creekside Lineup

There are other ways of getting mountain access—if you’re down to outrun the patrol people while hiking up the mountain every day, power to you. Hey you don’t have to wait in the gondola line.

Choose whatever works for you, and sweet dreams of the 2012/2013 season.

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