National Geographic Photographer Attempting New Route Up Everest

National Geographic Photographer Attempting New Route Up Everest

Climbing

National Geographic Photographer Attempting New Route Up Everest

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“When you’re riding the line between life and death, the clarity is tack sharp.” –Nat Geo photographer Cory Richards

Follow along with alpinist and Nat Geo photographer Cory Richards as he preps to tackle a new route on Everest. This new webseries by ROAM TV dives deep into the training, psychology, and routines that go into creating a new line on the world’s tallest peak. Cory is a huge advocate of mental health and uses climbing as a platform to talk about the issue. Gnarly goal, noble cause, stellar dude:

…as a NatGeo photographer Cory’s Instagram page is obviously amazing. FOLLOW HERE:

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I took this photo during my first assignment for @natgeo magazine. The two Tibetan kids in the photo are in an area of upper Mustang called Chhoser, where the people still inhabit cave dwellings. I have a deep passion for Tibetan their culture, and I try to use images to promote its preservation. These two kids stepped in front of the camera and made the Namaste gesture you see in the image without being prompted or cued. And I was fortunate enough to be there with my camera to make the shot. They remind me that my decisions have impacts that are more far-reaching than I might think. When I make a decision in my life, I want to be conscious of how I can positively or negatively impact the entire human family. Knowing that there are these fragile cultures out there, and our decisions do have impacts, is very important. This print is for sale at any National Geographic Fine Art gallery and online on their site. @natgeofineart galleries help people better understand the world and their role in it through fine art photography. @natgeo returns 27% of proceeds to the nonprofit National Geographic Society to fund work in the areas of science, exploration, conservation and education. Be inspired. #natgeofineart #natgeo #nationalgeographic

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You know what they say about Nostalgia? It ain’t what it used to be. A group of Khoisan warm themselves at a fire after leading a ‘Bushman Experience’. Upon close inspection, the ‘authenticity’ of this scene begins to dissolve. . . Khoisan is a unifying name for two groups of peoples of Southern Africa who share ethnic, cultural, and putative linguistic characteristics distinct from the Bantu majority of the region. They are often referred to as ‘bushmen’ based on their traditional nomadic hunter/gatherer culture. As per this image, most of that culture is preserved in the form of cultural tourism where otherwise modern Khoisan lead a Bushman Experience for visiting tourists. Cultural tourism is a complex issue. Many people reject it as ‘fake’, often failing to see the irony that underscores their disappointment in the fact that this cultural paradigm is no longer ‘real’. The Khoisan, like most minority communities, have faced massive marginalization at the hands of the surrounding governments. This kind of employment offers some financial support while helping some element of the culture persist. Regardless, the opinions are mixed and passionate. Shot on assignment with @intotheokavango led by @drsteveboyes with support from @natgeo @markstonephoto

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images from coryrichards IG

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