10 Human-Triggered Avalanches Reported In The Tetons Over The Weekend

10 Human-Triggered Avalanches Reported In The Tetons Over The Weekend

Avalanche

10 Human-Triggered Avalanches Reported In The Tetons Over The Weekend

Incident map for Teton Pass | Photo Credit: Bridger-Teton Avalanche Center

Incident map for Teton Pass | Photo Credit: Bridger-Teton Avalanche Center | Cover Photo: Jerome Bon

While backcountry skiing, riding, and snowmobiling all rise in popularity, avalanche forecasters are beginning to see a spike in early season incidents.

Related: The Best Avalanche Safety Video Ever! #KBYG

Known for its plethora of backcountry options, Jackson Hole is taking center stage this season as Bob Comey of The Bridger-Teton Avalanche Center recently told the Jackson Hole News and Guide that 10 people reported human-triggered avalanches over the weekend.

screen-shot-2016-12-13-at-9-25-49-am

Avalanche danger today in the Tetons | Photo Credit: Bridger-Teton Avalanche Center

Of the 10 incidents, 7 were caused by skiers, 1 by a snowboarder, and 2 by snowmachiners. The scariest avalanche report came from Togwotee Pass, where three skiers were caught in the middle of a slide near Breccia Peak. Two of the three skiers were able to dig themselves out before recovering their other partially buried friend. They all walked away from the scene unharmed.

The slide near Breccia Peak | Photo Credit:

The slide near Breccia Peak | Photo Credit: Bridger-Teton Avalanche Center

STAY SAFE OUT THERE AND #KBYG!

Find up-to-date avalanche advisories for the Tetons here: Bridger-Teton Avalanche Center

GENERAL AVALANCHE ADVISORY (Tetons)

Very large deep slab avalanches continue to be a substantial threat. Evidence of recent natural deep slab avalanche releases were reported to have been observed on Cody Bowl yesterday and off of Mt. Taylor the day before. A snowmobile remotely triggered a three foot deep slab in the drainage above Ski Lake yesterday. Similar events are possible today. Several close calls occurred on Saturday. Surface slabs one to three feet in depth caused by four days of strong winds also present a hazard at the mid and upper elevations and in isolated terrain features at the lower elevations. Expert avalanche hazard assessment and route finding skills are essential for safe travel in avalanche terrain today.

screen-shot-2016-12-13-at-9-28-18-am

Find the entire JH News and Guide article here: Weekend full of avalanches

 

The Latest

More Unofficial Networks
Home