You gotta hand it to the National Parks Service. It’s impossible to keep every tourist safe in the vast wilderness of our country’s beautiful National Parks, but the NPS is still trying.

It’s that time of year where we see videos everyday of ignorant tourists taking selfies with bison, getting charged by angry elk, and getting way too close to bears.

The National Parks Service released a PSA about wildlife safety in response to the recent incidents. It’s a little bit humorous, but apparently necessary considering how often this crap happens.

I recommended earlier this week that the NPS require tourists to take an animal safety class before visiting. I still stand by that. These crazy people just can’t be trusted with their own safety… 😂

It’s getting to be that season again…

National parks offer a unique experience for watching wildlife. But with that privilege comes great responsibility. Visitors are responsible for their own safety and for the safety of the animals, too. Simply put, leave animals alone—no touching, no feeding, no harassing. Just remember to keep your distance, and enjoy your experience watching wildlife.

This message is not for those followers who know what’s up and would never dream of getting too close to wildlife on purpose. Thanks for leading by example! Think of this as a message to share with others you know heading out to a park. “Vacation brain” sometimes takes over, and people may let their guard down, or get taken in by bear’s ears and other cuddly thoughts, only to have a less than pleasant experience in nature. It happens. Every year.

Infographic entitled “Wildlife Safety” with a chart of two columns. First row has an illustration of someone feeding a squirrel “nope” example next to an illustration of a person distanced next to no feed sign as “better” example. Second row has an illustration of a person taking a selfie next to a bear as and the word “nope” next to an illustration of a person far away from a bear with words, “good job”. Third row has an illustration of a person next to a moose with the word “nope” next to an illustration of a person far away from a moose with words, “now you got it”. Fourth row has an illustration of a person about to touch a bison as a “nope” example next to an illustration of a person running away from charging bison herd with words “Good luck”.”