A surfer at Marina State Beach in Monterey Bay was bitten by a Great White Shark at 7am on Saturday, October 29th, 2011. 27 year old Eric Tarantino was bitten on the right side of his body resulting in gashes on his neck, shoulder, forearm, and wrist. His surfboard has a 19 inch chunk missing. Eric’s injuries are not life threatening and he’s expected to make a full recovery. He’s currently in the Regional Medical Center in San Jose. Great White Shark Attacks Surfer on Northern California Coast | Unofficial Networks

Great White Shark Attacks Surfer on Northern California Coast

Great White Shark Attacks Surfer on Northern California Coast

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Great White Shark Attacks Surfer on Northern California Coast

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Yeah, that’s cool…you take this one…(actually a dolphin, scared that guy, tho)

A surfer at Marina State Beach in Monterey Bay was bitten by a Great White Shark at 7am on Saturday, October 29th, 2011.

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Hear this Saturday shark story from witnesses.

27 year old Eric Tarantino was bitten on the right side of his body resulting in gashes on his neck, shoulder, forearm, and wrist.  His surfboard has a 19 inch diameter bite mark.  Eric’s injuries are not life threatening and he’s expected to make a full recovery.  He’s currently in the Regional Medical Center in San Jose.

The shark bite damage to Eric’s surfboard. photo: AP Photo/Monterey County Herald, David Ro

October 28th, 2011 Shark Attack Breakdown:

– 19 inch bite mark on surfboard

– Great White Shark estimated to have been a 15 -20 feet long 

– Lotsa seals and mackerel currently in Monterey Bay = lotsa shark food = lotsa sharks in Monterey Bay right now

– This was the 11th Great White Shark attack in Monterey Bay since 1952.

Actual photograph taken in California in the 70s

Story:

“It was still twilight and Eric and Brandon were the first two out there,” said Skip Londos of Seaside. “Within about 10 minutes we saw both of them turn around and start paddling in quickly, and a lot of us who surf here consistently realized right away they must have seen a shark.

“Eric had paddled a little bit deeper than me, onto the peak,” McKibben (who was surfing with Eric) said. “I went up over the top of the wave and as I was coming down I could hear him yelling ‘Shark! Shark!’ And at that point we turned around and started paddling in as fast as we could. Luckily, a few minutes later a set (of waves) came in and we were able to catch it and ride in on our stomachs.”- montereyherald.com

Todd Endris shark attack wound - August 2007

Upon reaching the beach, Eric’s wounds were wrapped with towels and tourniquets were applied by surfers on the beach.  8 minutes later, paramedics arrived and took over.  Eric was airlifted to San Jose.

“The gash to the top of Eric’s forearm was probably 2 inches long. The two gashes on the wrist area were about 4 to 6 inches. The injury to his neck was 2 inches, but fairly deep,” Paul Morris (local dentist & surfer) said. “But he was conscious and responsive when people were talking to him and his color looked good.” – montereyherald.com

 

Whitey jumps

Guess where the last Great White Attack in Nor Cal happened.  Yep, Marina State Park in Monterey Bay.  That Great White attack occured in August 2007 and the shredded wound Todd Endris received required 500 stitches and 200 staples to close up.  The shark involved was estimated to be 12 feet long.

Apparently, dolphins swarmed Todd, fought the shark back, and saved him.

“This thing today kind of brought it all back to me,” said Endris, who happened to arrive at the scene shortly after the attack. “A pod of dolphins saved me. They were jumping over my head, surrounding me, beating up the shark. People initially thought the dolphins were attacking me until they saw the shark come up with me in his mouth.” – montereyherald.com

First hand account of Todd Endris shark attack in August 2007.

 

A surfer in Oregon was thrown from his board and had a HUGE chunk taken out of it this summer.

Last week, George Thomas Wainwright was killed by a ten foot Great White Shark in Australia.

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