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Information provided by sierraavalanchecenter.org

A party of 5 skiers was descending Echo Peak one at a time. One skier with terrain familiarity chose to descend a steeper area above a small cliff and abrupt slope angle transition which represented a terrain trap. Upon reaching a convex portion of the slope where slope angle increased to 44 to 47 degrees, the avalanche was initiated. The wind slab failed on a 1.5 inch thick layer of lower density storm snow with a small amount of graupel present within the layer. Slab thickness ranged from around 6 inches near the trigger point to near 18 inches at the skier’s right edge of the crown near the ridgeline. The skier was carried over the small cliff and buried in the terrain trap below. The skier was able to put a hand up above the snow surface and then brush snow away from his airway which was under the snow surface. Otherwise, the buried individual was unable to move. The other members of the group organized their rescue, keeping two members in a safe area on the ridge and sending two other members one at a time down to the buried individual. The buried individual was found via the visual clue of a waiving hand just above the snow surface. A transceiver search was not needed.

Video 1: Footage of the skier triggering the avalanche and companion rescue. The exchange of transceiver and backpack shown in the video was due to the presence of two transceivers, two shovels, and two probes carried in total within the group of five. One of those transceivers and one set of rescue gear was with the buried individual. A lack of familiarity with the packed rescue equipment lead to use of the shovel blade without the handle.

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Skier triggered avalanche on Echo Peak

Location Name: Echo Peak
Region: Echo Summit Area

See map: Google Maps

Date and time of avalanche (best estimate if unknown):

Sat, 12/29/2012 – 1:10pm

Red Flags: Recent loading by new snow, wind, or rain

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178 Comments

  1. AM says:

    you guys are fucking kooks. I would have punched you square in the dick for taking so long. lucky you’re buddy didn’t die while you’re telling sally to take her time with the beacon. please stay out of the backcountry.

    Reply
    • AM says:

      *your buddy. yah yah

      Reply
    • randombeater says:

      Be prepared or don’t go. His friend is lucky to be alive. What a wreck to watch, give me your beacon!! You’ve got to be kidding me. F*kin junk show.

      Reply
    • Yoyo says:

      Why wear a backpack Mr. rescuer? Is that reserved for your camel back, and apres ski attire? I would be willing to bet that if this guy’s hand wasn’t sticking out, he would be dead. If you don’t even own a beacon, I would imagine you have no idea how it even works. Love the part where the buried victim is digging out himself while his buddy is trying to figure out if he should put on gloves or not. These people didn’t even know how to shovel let alone perform a rescue. Almost entertaining how they attempt to uncover the victim’s gloves and pull him out without even thinking about making sure the victim has a clear airway. These people are exactly the profile that you expect to see in trouble in the backcountry. Not prepared, not educated, not responsible… should be gaping it up at the resorts.

      Reply
    • Veruca Salt says:

      I like how bosskook tries to dislocate the still buried victim’s shoulder out by pulling his hand… :facepalm.

      Reply
    • Anonymous says:

      STAY IN THE BAY AREA GAPPERS….WHAT A CLOWN SHOW…

      Reply
    • if he was upside down or fully buried, he would be dead. I cant believe it took them two mins to even head down.

      Reply
  2. Johnny Green Jeans says:

    Footage of the skier triggering the avalanche and companion rescue. The exchange of transceiver and backpack shown in the video was due to the presence of two transceivers, two shovels, and two probes carried in total within the group of five. One of those transceivers and one set of rescue gear was with the buried individual. A lack of familiarity with the packed rescue equipment lead to use of the shovel blade without the handle.

    Merry Christmas, these idiots are lucky to be alive.

    Reply
  3. Bueno says:

    Wow. Where da fuck are homies gloves? It’s a good thing his buddy’s hand was out of the snow or I don’t see that ending well.

    Reply
    • bckcntryxplr says:

      numb nuts started the “rescue” by taking off his gloves… a 10 year old knows better… sorry that’s too harsh for people younger than 10… toddlers know better.

      Reply
  4. d says:

    come on guys really, 5 people, two transceivers, can’t even put the shovel together to properly dig the victim out, after the avi cycle we’ve been having….what a shitshow…..just asking to kill your buddies

    Reply
  5. Scott_H says:

    Enough money for helmet cams but not for each skier to be carrying the appropriate search and rescue gear for backcountry travel? Shame on them.

    Reply
  6. SkiTheBigSky says:

    Wow! I hope this footage is shown in courses in the future of what not to do. Good thing time was not critical. They spent over 90 seconds just switching gear. EVERYONE needs to have shovel, probe & beacon if you venture into the sidecountry or BC.

    Reply
  7. JohnnyG says:

    unwise decision making all around… glad they’re ok.

    Reply
  8. Original content please...... says:

    Please stick to groomers, you morons in this vid don’t have brains to even ski powder at at a resort, let alone in the backcountry. “Give me your transceiver” What a bunch of tools.

    Reply
  9. DG says:

    It’s a good thing the buried skier was able to get his hand up. I don’t think that group would have a clue how to rescue someone with a beacon search. Why would you use a shovel without a handle and no gloves on?? You should have no business being out there unless you’re trained and all people have backcountry gear.

    Reply
  10. Art Vandelay says:

    The people pictured in this video are insanely incompetent.

    Where is the sense of urgency? Why don’t they all have beacons, shovels, probes in the first place? Why are they standing around, taking their time, twiddling their thumbs? Why don’t they ski down the slide path to ensure they don’t miss anything, rather than skiing powder down the side through other potential slide paths? Why are you digging like my grandmother, as if you’re trying to carefully carve around your buddy and not remove him fromt he snow? Why do you take breaks to delicately wipe his goggle lenses with your bare hands when he’s still fucking buried?

    I hope the guy who fortunately survived this burial finds some new friends to ski with.

    Reply
    • Veruca Salt says:

      Word.. but as evidenced in the video, just because you have a beacon doesn’t mean you’re competent enough to use it

      Reply
  11. weekend warrior says:

    Seriously,

    Scott_H is right. Enough money for helmet cams and not for essential backcountry equipment. If you don’t have the gear or if you don’t know how to use it you don’t belong out there. This is not a game. People die with the correct training and equipment. Without you don’t stand a chance.

    Reply
  12. What a tool says:

    sprung for a goPro but not a transceiver.

    God help us…….

    Reply
  13. Tram says:

    The lead responder seemed to have a decent knowledge but had no beacon or avy gear? He was calm and seemed to make sure of scene safety, which is good. The others looked completly lost and/or scared. They did follow good decente protocol which saved more of them from being trapped. If it was me I would have wanted a faster response, I’m sure it was a good learning experience. It could have been deadly though. Remember when you go out its you’re friends who will save you and make sure they are up to speed.

    Reply
    • Original content please...... says:

      The lead guy did nothing right. There was no scene safety. This video should be studied in avy classes for years to come about exactly how not to act before, during and after an avalanche.

      Reply
      • Skisquaw says:

        I agree this video should be studied in avy classes of what not to do .. wow scary

        Reply
      • John D. says:

        I agree with Tram the only two things that he did “right” was: (1) Insisting the whole group to keep and eye on the victim for a last scene point and having an idea where to start a search (2) staying calm and not freaking out. He even secured a 3′rd bonus point for not leaving the scene and going for help.

        Other than that lots to be learnt from this incident of what not to do. People look at me funny when I tell them I practice digging in my backyard at the start of the season and yet here’s a video of someone who can’t event get a shovel handle together – yet alone get others in their group to help move snow quicker.

        Reply
        • funky monkey says:

          He did absolutely nothing right. There’s a difference between remaining calm and at least having a sense of urgency. The 30 seconds he took deciding whether or not to put his gloves on could have been the difference between life and death if his buddy was really buried or had suffered serious trauma on the way down. then skiing powder on a shoulder that could have slid to further burry his buddy, as well as himself, instead of skiing the slide path. I hope this inspires these guys to get educated

          Reply
  14. Z says:

    TAKE YOUR TIME????? You freaking IDIOT!!! Jesus you’re lucky…..

    Reply
  15. Don Attix says:

    this is certianly a lesson on how not to go into the back country. Lots can be learned by watchng and seeing everything that was done wrong, of course it is easy to critize after the fact but starting from the beginning: Don’t go without proper equipment and training, everyone with a beacn, shovel and probe., Take an Ave’ course, no guarntee but knowledge beats out ignorance every time. Don’t take off your gloves. Dig below the victim, scooping away the snow. Use all available manpower, the guy standing next to the digger and victum should have been digging also. Just a few comments…… learn by others mistakes..

    Reply
  16. Mathew says:

    I’ve never ever been of this mindset… but each year’s retarded displays of incompetency bring me closer. Avy 1 Certification needs to be mandatory, minimum. If your group requires rescue and it’s decided you don’t have the proper experience/requirements to handle the situation you pick up the costs/fine.

    With the trend seen in recent seasons there has to be a deterrent other than death (which seems to be overlooked).

    Reply
    • Morgan says:

      I appreciate the sentiment here, but I’m not sure I fully understand what you are saying. Are you suggesting that their should be legal penalties if you fail to perform a safe avalanche rescue, or are you saying that people should pay for rescue efforts undertaken on their behalf?

      It is important to remember that when you venture out into the back country, YOU assume the risk. If you bring people who don’t know what they are doing in an avalanche situation, you assume that risk as well, god forbid you find yourself under the snow . The last thing that we need to do is introduce our nation’s over litigious habits into the back country.

      Reply
  17. Bryan says:

    Ahh fuck it dig yourself out….haha man that was painful to watch.

    Reply
  18. DavidT says:

    Hmm, more luck than judgement the first one ended OK, clearly not enough kit or people with the first clue of what to do with it!

    Reply
  19. DavidT says:

    Oh and just spotted the bit about 2 sets of kit so 50% of rescue kit lost in this case and a 60% chance anyone buried wouldn’t have a transceiver, not odds I’d like to face!

    Reply
  20. Yobrobra says:

    Wow! While “group leader ” is getting the rental beacon the other guy is saying “I can see him” and yet GL persists in wasting time. I love the “one skier with terrain familiarity” clearly not. Maybe he meant he’d been on snow before! Miracle he got a hand up out of the snow or he’d be dead. No thanks to the mindless fucks he chose to go in back country with. Best part is when rescuer says “just relax” while wielding a handle-less shovel. If there had been a secondary slide both transceivers would have been buried. Stay out of the BC!

    Reply
    • John D. says:

      The part I find most incredible is that he starts bitching about how his friend scared the shit out him before he even clears his airway! WTF priorities man.

      Reply
      • EJK says:

        Actually, if you watch it again, its apparent the buried guy said he’s okay “just dig me out” (about 3:27 in the film) within ten seconds of the rescuer getting there . Still, it took too long to get there because only two had beacons.

        Reply
  21. Skisquaw says:

    Ok I get the idea to remain calm and not panic and I like that you keep eyes on your friend the entire time he was sliding so you can locate him once he stops but GUYS where is the sense of urgency???? Seriously are you all too high to realize your friend could be dead in seconds??? In these situations every second counts and you guys dicked around over 150 seconds before the first shovel hit the snow. Try and hold your breath for three minutes most people would be dead. Your friend is seriously lucky that he somehow kept a clear air path for himself because you guys totally failed him and he would be dead if not for luck.

    Additionally why don’t you all have beacons, shovels, probes in the first place? Don’t get a Go Pro and not the right gear to save a life…Why are people standing around, taking their sweet time, twiddling their thumbs and not taking action? Every Second counts …. And yet only one person took action even though a turtle would be faster to his rescue.

    Guy that is digging I do not think your friend is going to care if he gets a cut from the shovel just get him air next time. Seriously turn up your level of urgency and start digging to get him AIR

    Reply
    • S-curvy says:

      It’s a balance. Yes, urgency counts, but additional slides could bring additional victims and no more S&R gear. Hangfire is bad juju and considering the brain is the MOST important tool to have, a few moments of calmness may have been a good idea. The fact that DiggerMan left his gloves behind reveals that he may have been calm and collected on the outside, but he probably still pissed in his pants on the inside. Get that brain tool warmed up.

      Reply
  22. Holy Shit says:

    Time to un-friend all of these kooks

    Reply
  23. winston says:

    Well the guy did do one thing right which was to watch the guy. After that it is a total shit show. Sadly he didn’t follow up on it by just skiing down and digging out the guy. He takes his gloves off for some stupid reason and doesn’t have his own avi gear so so stupid!

    Reply
  24. jstout says:

    Kooks. i say let natural selection get ride of these idiots for us. Why the fuck didnt every one have a beacon? i mean come on, are they really sharing beacons? And they dont know where the probe is in their own packs and they cant find the shovel handle and telling people to take their time. Where was the sense of urgency? WTF?

    Reply
  25. Anonymous says:

    No way in hell I would ski w/ those keystoned cops…took over 2 mins just to get to him. If he would have been burried…I don’t know”??? SOOOOOOOO UNPREPAIRED!!!! Give me a beacon….got any gloves…where’s the handle…where is the probe…WTF.

    Reply
  26. almost a Darwinian moment says:

    took over 2.5 minutes to start to dig him out, and that is WITHOUT a beacon search. the buried dude is LUCKY!!

    Reply
  27. Rob Baker says:

    I agree. I would have been ashamed to post this video!

    Reply
    • i was thinking the same thing, but im glad they did, will hopefully teach kooks a thing or two. that dude is soooo lucky, his friends were useless and his hand above the snow is the only thing that saved him.

      Reply
  28. DoubleB says:

    me and a buddy actually followed this group up Echo Peak. We couldn’t believe this guy was going to ski that aspect. We looked down that same slope 10 minutes earlier and easily decided it was not the day to ski it. From our interaction with this group it seemed half of them had no business even
    Being up there, and when I read only 2 beacons/ shovels between five people and my assumption was correct. Me and my buddy took our first dozen turns off the top and stopped 15 yards from the remaining 3 members of this group while the rescue was ongoing below them. We could not see the rescue going on and they did not inform us or ask for our assistance. They just stood there like it was just any other day in the backcountry. My buddy is a fireman/EMT and could have been of great use.

    Reply
    • S-curvy says:

      Wow! No joke?! From DiggerMan’s helmet cam, the slope looked way to aggressive to drop w/o PPE even on a good day.

      The good news might be that they lived, and hopefully their story will scare many more people out of the side and backcountry.

      Reply
  29. Scary Larry says:

    Wow, these people were so brave for posting this but at the same time so responsible of them to do so. Responsible in the sense that it should scare the shit out of anyone even thinking about going into the back country unprepared. With their casual and unprepared attitudes it is very surprising things didn’t turn out worse. Very, very scary!

    Reply
  30. Squaw Skier says:

    “give me you beacon!” “its ok.” WTF! who says this if my buddy is caught in a avalanche I am wiping out my beacon

    Reply
  31. Travis R. says:

    I work at a sports store at the moment and we rent gear, it pain’s me when we when we get people like this, you shouldn’t be out there… your a group of how many? and you only want a couple beacons? sometimes they won’t go for any probes because one person in the group has some poles that turn into a probe… It baffles my mind, it costs $20 to rent beacon/shovel/probe and people refuse because its so expensive. Unfortunately maybe 1 in every 8 groups that come through have any training.

    Reply
    • Anonymous says:

      Why rent the gear then? You, or your employer, is enabling this irresponsible behavior.

      Reply
      • S-curvy says:

        Oh please! Stop and think about what you’re saying. If you personally are a back country skier, then you and I, and everyone else on this site need to be honest and acknowledge that some of the reasons we go off-piste is specifically because we don’t want to be nannied, we don’t easily accept rules, it is one of the few periods in our lives where we get to live 100% in our space and our own sphere of responsibility. We all had better know that the second we leave the plowed road or cross that resort boundary marker (for the lightweights who shy away from earning their turns) that it is all about 100% commitment — the rule is: There will be no rescue other than self-rescue. Don’t blame the vendors.

        Reply
    • Veruca Salt says:

      I dig that you guys are trying to get people out there and make a little dough doing so but, someone is going to have to live with themselves when the “rental party” returns one person short.

      Reply
    • S-curvy says:

      I’ve been in stores and heard exactly what you’re describing, and it totally blows the mind. The broken logic of it is pretty stunning: Somehow, they grasp that they need some of the gear, but then they balk at the cost of the whole package because they want to save less than $10. Never mind that the stores pretty much have to drop in a brand new set of alkaline batteries each time they rent the beacon out.

      The scenario seems to be that the group leader, who is probably the best skier in the group and has convinced himself that that automatically equals backcountry know-how, has somehow gathered the confidence (notice I didn’t say experience or training or knowledge) after some other lightweight took him into the backcountry once or twice (and they survived), and now the group leader is all ready to share the love w/ his pals.

      My daddy always told me to be nervous when my friends would say, “C’mon in, the water’s great!”

      Reply
  32. Ride30B430 says:

    I know it is easy to rip these guys, but I do admire the fact they posted this video. I am just starting to move into the sidecountry/backcountry so last season I purchased gear (Pack, Beacon, Shovel, Probe. I do not have a GoPro ,since I am no Pro) and took a class on how to use it. This month I signed up for an AIARE L1 class and paid $400. It seemed like a lot of money, I am now CERTAIN it is worth it. This is a good video for people like me to watch. I understand the risks involved but seeing this live was shocking. These guys got real lucky that only the wind slab went! If it broke to early Dec this guy was dead. Thanks for posting. Live and learn, maybe they will be in my class. Happy New Year.

    Reply
    • Than Thou says:

      You sound like the exact opposite of that crew. Knowledge is king . Be safe and have fun!

      Reply
    • Anonymous says:

      These tools did not post this video; Sierra Avalanche Center did.

      Reply
      • Veruca Salt says:

        … and where did Sierra Avy Center get the vid? Right, from the kook with the go pro who had the balls to hand it over for educational purposes… which turns out to be the only thing he did correctly.

        Reply
  33. Mark S says:

    Not too mention, these conditions, open face, cutting across the top before dropping in – Shouldn’t have been there in the first place, period.

    Reply
  34. Grant says:

    This almost seems staged because it’s so stupid it’s almost comical. I’m grateful that these people were willing to release the entire video and open themselves up to some pretty serious criticism. I hope in the end it saves some lives.

    Reply
  35. curmudgeon says:

    That was scary….really scary. Almost made me kinda sick watching it.

    Reply
    • SkiPatrol1 says:

      Insanely sick watching this, i was actually yelling at the computer to hurry the F$#!* up! Insanely lucky, thank goodness, worst trip leader EVER

      Reply
  36. gnarwhal says:

    This is quite possibly the most irresponsible search methodology I have ever witnessed. Thank god you all made it out alive. If you havent already please take an avy course or two, practice, and hopefully we can all learn from what you posted. Good share

    Reply
  37. telebabe says:

    This was killin me. I second all that was said above. Stay out if your not prepared. How could you possibly think it was ok to venture back there without everyone equipped. Jesus’ put your gloves on so you don’t become the 2nd victim. This was so painful to watch, what a bunch of idiots making, dumb mistakes. Let’s go ski the wind loaded area. Not one of them has probably taken an avalanche course.

    Reply
  38. GNAPER says:

    So lucky to be alive, good God. Can anyone say, “Darwin Award.” Stay on the resort till you know what the fuck your doing or don’t go out there ever again.

    Reply
  39. Miles says:

    It’s shit like this that gives my mom gray hair about me skiing the backcountry. If only the slide had taken out the entire group and removed them from the gene pool……

    Reply
  40. frances the mute says:

    Wow it hurts watching this. I wanted to punch these guys through my computer screen. I don’t think these people realize the severity of the situation.

    Reply
  41. scott bones says:

    That’s really difficult to watch, better to be lucky than good,wow

    Reply
  42. Coreski says:

    I like how the guy starts digging himself out, as the ‘rescuer’ stops to warm up his hands…. F-ing ridiculous!!!!

    Reply
    • HappyNewYEAR says:

      What Bryan said “Ahh fuck it dig yourself out” LOL. It also kills me that he’s telling his friend how he “scared the shit out him” before he even clears his airway. What a doochenozzle.

      Reply
  43. Mark says:

    Wow these skiiers are so fuckin retarded i cant even believe! they should not ski ever again

    Reply
  44. Vail Freeski says:

    This dude shovels like a pussy!

    Reply
  45. OB says:

    This video almost made me cry… So glad that the burred guy made it. Never ever again go to ski in backcountry with those your ski “buddies”. They clearly have no clue what they are doing out there.

    Reply
  46. bigbsurfer says:

    So glad you posted your video so other people can watch it and learn just about everything that could go wrong during this situation. Everyone is really lucky no one esp the buried rider were hurt or worse. It’s almost painful to watch this guy…They all better just stick to riding lifts. You don’t belong out there.

    Reply
  47. HS says:

    An educational video on what not to do.

    Reply
  48. Drew says:

    Glad these arent my friends…. They should be playing golf or tennis… That guy was a red light in red light terrain with red light conditions and is lucky to be alive.

    Reply
  49. rick says:

    i’ve taken a few Avi classes and a couple of crevasse rescue classes …..I see this as the norm. The people commenting are jerks and second guessing the outcome. 90 percent of you would have done worse.
    STFU …..

    Reply
    • Trulio says:

      @rick

      Ii really don’t think this scenario could of been handled any worse than it did!

      I am pretty sure that 90% of everybody commenting would handle this situation in a different fashion! These people in this video DO NOT BELONG in the backcountry. These people are complete fuckng idiots.

      These people belong at northstar!!!

      Reply
    • Asnowboarder says:

      Shut the F up yourself! Why are you standing up for these irresponsible folks who have such a severe lack of situational awareness? I have taught classes to people, probably like yourself, whom I am only nice to and encouraging of their ignorant behavior because there isn’t another way to make a living with out totally selling my soul. Signing up and paying money for a class never determines competence.

      Reply
    • bckcntryxplr says:

      mental note… don’t ski with rick.

      Reply
    • Than Thou says:

      You’re just as stupid as those in the vid. 90%? Are you sure it’s not 92% or maybe it’s 8%. Way to judge people you know nothing about. If you see this as the norm than I am glad to never know you. Another Darwin application…

      Reply
    • Veruca Salt says:

      So you were the LeadKOOK in the video.. what Avi classes did you take, the free beacon demo at Squaw?

      You sir are an idiot.

      Reply
    • S-curvy says:

      Yep, you’re on to something @Rick. This vid is the real deal, complete w/ naked panic. When me and my BC buds get together for our annual avy practice, we purposely create these very same scenarios, complete w/ role playing (the exercise leader secretly tells each player exactly what they are supposed to do so that no one else knows what’s going to unfold). One the guys in our group got really pissed off at me, because my role was to be the panicky diversion, he was the search leader, and I was told to give him completely erroneous information about how many were in our group and where I thought I had seen signs of burial and so on. He really freaked out and I felt bad, but it was a great exercise that went better than this one, but that’s only because everyone was properly equipped and had some knowledge of how to do what needed to be done.

      The best case scenario for this group was that the victim and the Digger were the only 2 people involved in this excursion, the other folks were just avy-meat and in the way; in other words, this was like a ski party of 2.

      Reply
    • you can stfu, the people youre referring to are people smart enough to know that they dont belong out there. these idiots were morons. 2 mins to even get the ppe from the chick while his buddy could have suffocated so easily in the next min or two it might have take to find him or get him an airway. give me a fckn break.

      Reply
  50. phil says:

    Painful to watch, but it will become a classic. We learn from mistakes, so there will be plenty of learning associated with this video. Give me your beacon and I’ll leave my gloves right here! WTF! Then the guy standing above is just standing there, While a member of his party is possibly dying, and he just stands there! Like he is absolutely bored or something! WTF!

    Reply
  51. skkoorb says:

    new years

    Reply
  52. yo says:

    Dudes really, your friend is buried and only one of you is digging ; with no gloves, you should have had him out of there in a few min, I know firsthand its shocking but………really one guy digging, l a m e

    Reply
  53. EJK says:

    Lots of self-righteous indignation to this post, but I’m willing to bet a sizable percentage of those lobbing criticisms wouldn’t have done much better. Yes, with the benefit of hindsight and from the comfort of my couch, I’d agree with the following critiques: 1) Everyone should have had equipment and known how to use it; 2) the beacon transfer could have been done faster (and shouldn’t have been necessary–see no. 1); 3) Someone should have found the shovel handle while the other guy was digging; 4) Unless, I’m missing something, others should have been digging as well; and 5) I’m sure there is a reason why the one guy was digging without his gloves, but I don’t know what it is.

    That being said, they did a few things well, and, unlike their critics, did so in the heat of the moment: 1) Kept eyes one the slider and pointed at him going down; 2) didn’t panic (screaming at the girl to hand over the beacon won’t have helped, it would have just freaked her out); 3) didn’t panic and mindlessly ski down a route likely to trigger a second slide; 4) posted this video so that others might learn from a real life situation what to do and what not do.

    As for not hacking away at him with the shovel, I’m not sure at what point the buried guy had his air passage. I did’t get the impression he had been gasping for air and suspect the people on the scene could tell that he was able to breath. If that’s so, at that point, slashing away at him with a shovel would not be the best course of action. If that’s not the case, then I’d agree more urgency (especially from the others not digging) was called for.

    Reply
    • bueno says:

      They had no clue if the guy could breath or not. They had no clue about the whole situation . Yeah they did one thing right by watching the dude take a slide…..other then that…..shit show at its finest

      Reply
      • EJK says:

        Within ten seconds of getting there, the buried guy says, “I’m okay. Just dig me out.” Of course this is at 3:27 of the video, so over two minutes since he was buried and until then they could not have known he was able to breath.

        Reply
    • BFD says:

      Big fucking deal. The only thing impressive is they had the balls to post this.

      Reply
    • Yoyo says:

      This group should have not been in the backcountry period!

      Reply
    • chuck j says:

      Correct me if I’m wrong but it would have made more sense to dig out the snow directly downhill of the skier, instead of trying to dig around him.

      Reply
    • Veruca Salt says:

      Dude if you need the benefit of hindsight to know not to go into the back country without a beacon, shovel and probe with the knowledge of how to use them and not to take your gloves off and not to try to yank your buried buddy out by his arm you shouldn’t be going out in the first place.

      Reply
  54. Biggus D says:

    wonder if dude ever found his skis

    Reply
  55. Sunnydays says:

    At least these guys are willing to have video posted (with critical comments) from which we can all learn

    A question, please
    Excuse my ignorance, but why is the guy requesting the beacon from the lady? Is this because he was worried about subsequent avalanches whilst going to his friend’s rescue, and wished to have one on him before going into high-risk area?

    Reply
    • Yoyo says:

      The guy doesn’t have his own beacon… They fucked up royally by not being prepared. All of them are lucky to be alive

      Reply
    • EJK says:

      That may be part of it, but unless he know for sure that you could see where the guy was buried, he’d also want to to do the search. (You switch modes from transmit to receive.) As others have said, the real question is why didn’t everyone didn’t have a beacon and why evidently was she not prepared to use it to search?

      Reply
    • Paul in Sac says:

      Why did she give him the beacon? She should have already been switching to receive.

      Reply
  56. Acme Backcountry Outfitters says:

    Sorry to pile on here, but I have to….
    This is truly scary to watch and can be used as an instructional video of about 20 things not to do.
    It looks like the skier started just below a hanging cornice some of which already released over the cliff – hello, clue #1 this might not be a great line to ski. Once the victim is buried, the video goes into a slow motion rescue.
    Fiddling with your gloves to get your pinky in just right, while the woman fiddles with her Avy beacon and doesn’t realize she might have to remove her jacket & pack, while the guy next to her is looking uphill… He’d be more productive picking his butt! All this while the frikkin friend is completely buried – are you kidding me? And they stayed so calm and clueless!
    Then, the one guy doing anything skis right above the victim on another convex steep slope – WTF?
    He’s more concerned with his cold hands – While everyone else does nothing – I could go on, but most of it has already been said.
    Wiley Coyote goes skiing with his Acme Backcountry gear.

    This group is far luckier than they realize, thank God.
    This is like a puzzle where you cite everything that is wrong with the picture.

    Reply
    • Yoyo says:

      He probably is struggling to breath, but I’m just gonna put on my gloves one at a time and move some snow around with half a shovel.

      Reply
    • sweetpt says:

      One thing you left out is how he dealt with the shovel blade. He laid it down several times on the backside instead of jamming it into the snow. It is amazing the blade didn’t go flying downhill. Couldn’t figure out why he didn’t get downhill of the buried skier and just start moving snow doggie dig style. He had the slope to move snow quickly.

      Reply
    • well said. and i like the notice of the pinky/glove thing. that made me want to punch bosskook’s face in. what a retard.

      Reply
  57. Jake says:

    Yes i agree with a lot of the things they did wrong, but you also have to look at a couple things they did right. The guy with the camera stayed very clam. He watched the skier the whole time and told his buddies to keep eyes on the skier during the slide. They all should carry beacons, shovels and probes period. They also need to work on speed they were a little slow to start the search. Glad to hear the guy was alive. Lesson learned, have beacons, shovels and probes for everyone and know how to use them. Don’t forget your gloves on the top of the mountain and know where your shovel handle is.

    Reply
    • Minnesota says:

      I think he’s calm because they could see a portion of the skiers body so he didn’t have any sense of urgency, but he didn’t have any idea at that point if it was his suffocating buddy or his buddy who preserved his airways hand.

      Reply
  58. Commuter says:

    I like the comment of, “You don’t need a Beacon… you can see him!!” Even the other stoned guy could tell that the GL was being an idiot. WOW… I’m still kinda shaking my head after watching that.

    Reply
  59. Buster Douglas says:

    What a bunch of assholes. Only two beacons
    in a group of 5, but you can afford a go pro??
    And how long does it take to find your gear?
    Do you know how to put a shovel together?
    And what the hell is homeboy doing just standing
    there not helping, posing for the camera? Oh
    yeah, almost forgot…NO SENSE OF URGENCY?!?!
    This is wrong on so many levels, I can’t believe you
    even posted this…I would be embarrassed. You
    idiots have no business in the backcountry until
    you can gain respect for it, as well as invest in
    the proper equipment. Your ignorance put your buddy’s
    life at risk.

    Reply
  60. Shred says:

    Hwy. 89 North to I-80 West. Don’t stop till you hit the Bay Bridge. No room for kooks like this in Tahoe.

    Reply
  61. Agent P says:

    I checked squaws web cams earlier in the week and every where the cams could see had slid. Everything. Then pay attention. (2) Killed in avys INBOUNDS.
    It would take an IQ of like 40 to know stay out of the BC.

    Reply
  62. Gaper says:

    That fuckn pussy was more worried about his hands getting a little cold then digging out his buddy….. fucking weak.

    Reply
    • totally and i like his pusswad arm swinging hand warming technique. lmao. legendary kooks. this couldve been a video of death had that been a foot and not a hand above the snow and his head was 6ft under, no air for 3mins…

      Reply
  63. yo says:

    painful to watch. glad the guy is alive

    Reply
  64. Dave J. says:

    Mistakes:

    Avi report warns of danger on N, NE slopes steeper than 35 degrees. Ignored.
    2 transceivers for 5 people. 3 short.
    Looks like only 1 shovel. Missing handle. Where are the other shovels?
    3 minutes+ to reach victim. Should have taken 30 seconds.
    All should be digging like someone’s life depends on it.
    Sense of urgency totally lacking. Victim is very lucky to be alive.

    This is what happens when people read an article on a blog, etc., on how cool backcountry skiing is and venture out unprepared. Fresh powder and all it takes is a little hiking. Put on this beacon deal (or not) and, magic!, you’re safe from harm. The ski manufacturers have improved the gear, attracting legions of resort skiers looking for adventure and fresh tracks. Most just aren’t willing to put in the training time necessary to minimize the danger as much as possible.

    Reply
  65. ryan says:

    Probe this, beacon that. blah blah blah. If you cant ski well enough to ride every slope like its going to rip and recognize where its most likley to go you should stay in a resort. The guys making slo mo jump turns in a wind loaded pocket on 40 deg slope next to some complex features. Then his buddy makes wobbly pizza pie turns fall line above his buddy on the same aspect that just slid. he’s lucky he didn’t pop a secondary slide. WTF are you going to do with your beacon, probe, helmet, airbag, radios…….. when a slide takes you through a cliff band or stand of trees. Glad to see you didnt become a stat but you put the buggy before the horse. Baby steps!

    Reply
  66. Anonymous says:

    I am disgusted…….

    Reply
  67. darwin says:

    wow, this is very sad. you losers should stay out of the fucking mountains. and homeboy burried, yes you are also a fucking idiot for being in the backcountry with those fools. you are lucky to be alive because if you were fully burried you would be dead. get a fucking clue!!!!!!!!! oh yea and other homeboy without the gloves on digging with the shovel blade your fucking gopro vids will not get you laid in fact you should give up skiing and go work at fucking mcdonalds!

    Reply
  68. WOW!! says:

    Whats with the guy in the dark outfit and white helmet JUST STANDING THERE??? OMG, this is the most frustrating part of this vid for me. This guy has no clue and should not be in the BC. I would be charging down the avy path looking for something, even if i had no beacon. No urgency at all as HIS “FRIEND” IS DYING!

    Reply
  69. shralp says:

    Wow these backcountry barnies need to have their names published so they can be publicly shamed! What a shitshow!!

    Reply
    • go home says:

      no business being out there, im glad no one was hurt.
      Though i did have a nice chuckle when they attempted to pull him out with a ski pole heh.
      and for the record barney is a word meant to be used by folks who are not barneys, haole boy. go back to the mainland!

      Reply
  70. slesarka says:

    wow i want to punch the guy in the white helmet so bad. He’s just standing there like he’s baked or some shit.

    Reply
  71. Anonymous says:

    This dude needs to find new friends. Lucky to be alive, sir.

    Reply
  72. Mimi says:

    Time is crucial!

    Reply
  73. chris says:

    idiots

    Reply
  74. cjp says:

    That’s why they call it dope

    Reply
  75. snowgoddess402 says:

    Just a couple thoughts: Sometimes a “sense of urgency” can be your worst enemy. If you start shouting, everyone gets freaked out, and they start running on adrenaline and then fumbling around–this delays the process. The “take your time” comment seems to carry this “be calm” mantra out too far….git your ass over there, buddy. Besides, If a hand is visible, you don’t need the beacon, nor a probe. You need a patent airway, workable (unfrozen) hands and a shovel. Just because the airway is patent, doesn’t mean the chest expansion is not being compressed by the weight of the snow. Confirm LOC and airway, dig out his chest wall. Then worry about his left shoulder. Just my opinion.

    Reply
  76. 2012 Darwin Award Winner says:

    And the 2012 Darwin Award goes to……

    Reply
  77. Anonymous says:

    Spent too much on his GoPro to afford a beacon I presume…

    Reply
  78. Gentile Sodomite says:

    “give me your gloves, i left mine on top of the run.”

    Reply
  79. jj says:

    He is not alive because of backcountry competency or avalanche awareness, he is alive because of LUCK, which rhymes with F*&K! 4 more inches of avalanche debris and this would have been a very tragic ending. This vid should be shown in every avy course in the world.

    Reply
  80. Janice says:

    you know things are bad when the buried guy starts using the shovel to dig himself out because the one halfway useful person has frozen his hands and the other two crew members are stunned into imobility

    Reply
  81. erik from 406 says:

    this is sad but i hope all involved read all that is here i know some are mean but the truth hurts and there lack of action could have killed

    Reply
  82. Sean says:

    Give me that shovel and ill dig myself out….wtf?!

    You move snow like my coma induced grand mother. Next time your worried about your cold hand, think of your buddy who could be dead or dieing. Gloves or no gloves handle or no handle. Your buddy should have been unburied in a fraction of the time it took. And homeboy who’s standing 10ft away. What is he afraid to stick his hands in the snow and get after it or what? Learn a thing or two about being prepared and most of all learn terrain management or stay out of the backcountry.

    Reply
  83. letsgoski says:

    Listen to the tone of the guys voice in the second video when he is conveying the aspect and slope degree….. such disappointment in the world.

    Reply
  84. Jason says:

    beacon in the pocket is quicker!

    Reply
  85. Tomahawk Tome says:

    You know what? I’ve changed my mind.
    This video actually shows a SUCCESS.

    A companion-rescue that worked. EX-CE=LLENT!
    Everyone stayed calm, and did their best.
    It’s not perfect, its not text-book, but everyone is ALIVE.
    Well done!
    Much respect to the victim for calmness under pressure; and to the primary rescuer for staying attentive, alert , and listening to the casualty.

    Good work by “amateurs” in a seriously scary situation.

    But if any of my experienced ski mates take this long to rescue me in a similar situation….
    I will buy them all beers..
    ..then break their f>in legs!!
    and buy them even more beers.

    Like they say in flying, the definition of a good landing is one you walk away from.

    T

    Reply
  86. Ski Bum says:

    This is proof that taking an L1 AIARE course along with beacon training at a BARE MINIMUM is essential. Worth the $400-500 price tag. That is just the beginning…
    For them to be out in those conditions and to be so ill prepared was awful. Glad they posted the vid though.

    Reply
  87. Jabriel says:

    Lot of words being wasted callin this team a bunch of idiots. Well your right, but really the important thing is to remember that few of us (even professionals) really practice rescue enough, take this video for motivation to go practice avalanche rescue. You can never practice too much.

    Reply
  88. Cedric G says:

    I feel that the buried skiier is at fault for the situation. He got buried after dropping in on a slope that was Avie prone, due to slope angle and recent loading, he chose that line. The group he decided to venture out with was unprepared to properly respond to such an event. It’s his fault he surrounded himself with a unprepared group. I could believe a scenario where the buried skiier persuaded other group members to venture out with him. The group did some right things (sort of), the wrong way, but luck kept the skiier alive.

    Reply
  89. MountainGoat says:

    What a disgusting display of inefficient recovery method and unprepared and uneducated backcountry skiers. That man would more than likely be dead if he was buried at all underneath the snow. Can you imagine the man with a helmet cam trying to work a beacon when he can’t even put together a shovel or keep a glove on?

    I almost jumped out of my seat when the skier who was buried started DIGGING HIMSELF OUT.

    Reply
  90. FFLpilot says:

    Wow, what a comedy of errors, it’s like two monkeys f’in a football with couple more monkeys standing around trying to learn how. I especially like how the guy in the white helmet proceeds to tell the trip leader how to ski down to the victim, after tanning around doing nothing. Then Mr. Trip Leader pizza-pies his way past an additional trigger-point in fresh snow above the victim. Speaking of which, the line of the ‘victim’ (term used rather loosely) between two trigger points just above a convexity is probably the worst line he could have chosen (you can clearly see this in the SAC pics).

    As was pointed out by most, little was done correctly, and making excuses for these people by assuming we’d all do no better is simply silly. This was horrifying to watch, and suggesting the guy lived because of his companions is ludicrous. He’d have been out by his own devices prior to the spring thaw without them.

    Reply
  91. Stacie says:

    Sounds like more people need an Avi class than ever before. Sierra College has an Avi 1 and an Avi 2, and they only charge $25/credit hour @ 4 credits, that’s ONLY $100 for a CA resident. There’s also some sweet group discount deals on beacon/probe/shovel/pack if you’re enrolled.

    Know what that means?

    NO EXCUSES.

    Reply
  92. Agent P says:

    tick tick tick tick tick tick tick tick Susie can i get the beacon tick tick tick tick tick tick tick tick tick tick can I get the shovel tick tick tick tick tick tick tick tick tick tick tick take you pack off tick tick tick tick tick tick tick where’s the handle tick tick tick tick tick tick tick you guys stay here tick tick tick tick tick tick tick tick tick tick tick
    Luck was the only skill they had

    Reply
  93. geriatic Skier Gurl says:

    After I saw this video, I bought yet another pair of unfashionably brightly colored gloves, just in case the only thing remaining above the snow are the fingers of one hand waving to the passer- bye while making my own airway…. hello there, mitten, are you attached to any human…. and I’m putting jerky in my pocket from now on, cause I know a few dogs who can dig a lot faster, and it would be nice to have a snack, or toss one up out the hole for Fido, while using the shovel blade myself.

    This example is even better than the time we had to dig another vehicle out of a snowbank up on the Sierra divide in the mid-summer, with people who blasted by us earlier on a single track trail, and landed it in the deep snow, (and partially snagged on a cut tree stump, which I had to lever them off of !) who were dressed in shorts and tank tops, and had a regular, no 4whd car with absolutely no winter type tools in it. And no cell phone reception up there, of course. Awesome. Congratulations.

    Reply
  94. emmett says:

    Glad they posted the video here is an explanation from the burial victim

    I know that our party, the party involved in the December 29th incident on Echo Peak, made numerous mistakes. I chose to make the helmet cam video available to Sierra Avalanche Center so that others could learn from our mistakes and not repeat them. As the leader of the party, I take full credit for all of the mistakes and want to document what I’ve learned from them.

    The first mistake was taking an inexperienced, ill-equipped group into the backcountry. Every member of the party should have been carrying a beacon, probe, and shovel. Additionally every member of the party should have been trained in avalanche safety. We only had two complete kits among our party of five, carried by the female skier in the video and by me, the skier who was caught in the slide. The other three members of the party were complete novices in the backcountry, able to ski black diamonds at a resort, but with no experience out of bounds. As the party leader, I should never have taken the group up Echo Peak, but I let the party’s excitement about the day sway my decision. I made a bad decision.

    The second mistake I made was allowing the excitement in the group to override sound decision making. Two of the inexperienced members of the party had never summited Echo. Safety and snow pack conditions dictated turning the group around at tree line and descending the ridge crest. However, I let emotion make the decision and allowed the party to continue above tree line to the summit. This decision required descending the slope directly above the ridge terminus. A slope that I knew was prone to sliding under the right circumstances, and having kept abreast of conditions, I knew conditions were conducive to an an avalanche. Again, I made a bad decision.

    We skied one at a time from the crest to a safe zone in the trees at the start of the ridge proper, but I made my third mistake by choosing to ski a line slightly skier’s left of the safest line to the meeting point in the trees. The female skier in the group asked that I not ski that line, but I let my emotions once again get the better of me. The several turns in untracked snow on a 45 degree slope were just too tempting. My intentions were to ski to skier’s left of the large rocks where the slide released from, then veer hard to skier’s right and meet the party on the ridge. I knew that the slope was convex. I knew that there was a rock band below my intended route. My thoughts were, “I’ve skied this line before. It’s only a few turns.” I made a very bad decision. Fortunately I have been able to kick myself repeatedly for it.

    Once the slope let go, I was helpless. Everything I’d ever heard, read, or talked about went through my mind. Stay on top. Get your feet downhill. Backstroke. Remember to create an air pocket when the slide slows. Punch a hand towards the sky. The truth is that I was at the mercy of the snow. I went over the rock step head first on my back. Fortunately, I didn’t crater on impact and end up buried by the rest of the snow as it came over the edge. Instead, I was rag dolled out of my crater and ended up somehow close to the surface. I was able to punch one fist upward as the slide slowed, but otherwise was completely unable to move. Everything was black and the urge to panic was overwhelming. After repeatedly telling myself to calm down, I was able to clear an airway with my free hand. Then all I could do was wait. I was very lucky.

    Much has been made on various forums about the way that the skier with the helmet cam handled the rescue. He has been flamed for taking his gloves off, for telling the female skier with the beacon to take her time in transitioning the gear to him, for not putting the handle in the shovel, ad infinitum. The truth is, I am proud of the way he, a novice at avalanche rescue, handled the situation. He knew that the female skier was panicking and had to keep her calm. He knew that the whole party shouldn’t descend to the burial site. He left two people on the ridge to watch the hangfire. Then he descended to the burial site with a partner, one at a time, in a controlled manner. In debriefing after the incident, we discussed what he could have done differently. It goes without saying that he should have left his gloves on. Other than that, there are two possible scenarios. First scenario:Once the skier in the black jacket had located my glove above the debris, the one unburied probe and beacon should have been left on the ridge. That way a beacon/probe search could have been initiated in the case of a secondary avalanche burying the rescue party. Second scenario: My glove was located above the debris, but what if my hand wasn’t in it? Seen from 100 meters away, it was impossible to tell. If the beacon and probe were left on the ridge, that would have led to additional delays in getting the rescue gear to the burial and would have put one more skier in the path of a secondary release. As for the unassembled shovel, I have to take credit for that mistake. I should have made sure that the entire party knew where the rescue gear was located and how to assemble it before ever leaving the trailhead. Finally, my rescuer didn’t relinquish shoveling duties to his partner once his hands started to freeze. He could have either taken the time to get gloves on his wet hands, or asked the skier in the black jacket to continue digging while he warmed his hands.

    I’m sure that there are many more lessons to learn from this incident. That is the reason that I chose to let Sierra Avalanche Center make the video public. My hope was that I would receive constructive criticism and maybe force other people to review their decisions and the process by which they make those decisions. I knew that we would be flamed for our mistakes, but I’ll take the flames if my mistakes will help keep others safe. My hope also is that all of the flaming does not discourage others from making public their mistakes, so that we, the backcountry community, can learn from each other. We all make mistakes, some of us more than others, I am sure, but we all make mistakes. I’ve watched countless avalanche videos and thought, “What an idiot!” “Why’d the dude do that?” or “That guy is completely clueless.” Guess this time I’m the idiot and the clueless one. Hopefully, because I chose to share this video, you won’t be the clueless one if or when things go wrong.”

    Reply
    • sweetpt says:

      Emmett,
      Thanks for your post.
      To the buried victim – Thank you giving your footage to the Sierra Avalanche Center. Your intent is admirable and hopefully the thousand of people who watch the video will learn from it. There are two things I would like to point out on this forum, having been on SAR for many years and a patroller for even more. 1. The best tool we carry with us when going into the backcountry is our brain. The decision making process (heuristics) is one of the most crucial and valuable pieces of gear we have when making the first decision … going out into avalanche terrain. 2. Everyone having the proper equipment and knowing how to use it is mandatory. Many years ago, a friend, whom I had not skied with before, taught me a great test. When he came by to pick me up for a day of skiing, he checked my transceiver skills out before we even got into the car. As we walked out the door, he turned to me and said, “I threw my transceiver out here somewhere. We ain’t goin’ skiing until you find it.” Boy, did I have to scramble. 3. An avalanche rescue begins the moment the decision is made to cross the ski area boundary. That means all equipment is accessible, functional and practiced.

      I am sorry you went through this experience, but you are alive and I am sure the experience has left a positive impression for your future adventures into the backcountry.
      You have an opportunity to become an expert in the use of all those avalanche tools and then teach others.

      Reply
  95. joost says:

    @ Emmet: good one posting the victims reaction. It is true they’ve made countless mistakes, but I think we can all agree that under the circumstances this is the best outcome. Nobody died. And it is a good wake up call for everyone who is just thinking about the fun and not about the responsibility towards your friends. I have a lot of friends who are just fooling around and still see backcountry boarding or skiing as a big party, not thinking about safety at all. I am happy to be able to show them this video.

    Reply
  96. Accidents of North America says:

    Thank you for sharing this video. It is a very helpful tool to teach others. It takes much courage to put your pride aside and share this with everyone. We all have made mistakes. Not everyone is willing to share thier own mistakes with others and possibly prevent accidents.
    Clearly lessons learned by all.
    Thanks again for the courge to share your own mistakes with us.

    Reply
  97. Millar says:

    While most of the posts are entertaining in their bombastic vitriol, the truth is that when the shit hits the fan ANYBODY can be made to look like a jackass, or wind up dead.

    The huffy presumption of “I’d certainly do better”… ? Well, that’s a BIG maybe.

    Those who presume to so called professionalism, or follow so-called professionals, or think they know how to do it die too, and often. Tunnel Creek anyone? Beglinger’s Selkirk Mountain Experience, La Traviata, anyone?

    I, for one, truly appreciate that this video was posted and the above comments made by one of those involved. That, not histrionic critiques and “flames” (though they are pretty entertaining) is truly honorable. Much appreciated, sir. Glad you are alive.

    Reply
  98. Kevin Daily says:

    These folk need to take an Avalanche 1 Course!

    Check out course offerings at the Bell Lake Yurt with Montana Backcountry Adventures!

    Reply
  99. DavidT says:

    Thanks for you honest and open reply Emmett, good to hear you are OK ad by the sounds of it have learned loads from the incident.

    Reply
  100. CrowleyCrawler says:

    The guy’s alive. Yeah, sure, they coulda done better, but who can really rehearse this stuff? Yeah, it was painful to watch, but wtf–the guy’s alive, thanks to his friends. Not everybody works on the ski patrol and practices 2X a week. They were enjoying the backcountry, had an incident, and lived to tell about it. Good for them. A little too much self-righteous indignation in this crowd. Not the kind of people I enjoy meeting in the mountains. Put on the Sound of Music and chill, please.

    Reply
    • sweetpt says:

      CrowleyCrawler if you are going into the backcountry, I hope you are practicing the use of your rescue equipment. 2X a week is a start. The reality is ski patrol, nor SAR is not going to save you or your buddies in an avalanche rescue situation. YOU ARE! By the time ski patrol or SAR reaches a reported avalanche, it is not a rescue. It is a body recovery.

      Reply
  101. ControlledRage says:

    With the ski gear available thesedays, out of bounds is becoming an attractive nuisance. The gods were smiling on these folks. If they dare to venture out beyond the controlled slopes again I believe they will be ready.

    Reply
  102. Chris B. says:

    I am not a skier but I am a walking, talking, thinking human being. To leave that poor guy laying there, out of your sight for the 3 minutes it took you to get to him…which was all of 20 seconds from where you were standing is outrageous. His luck was he was not injured and that he could poke his arm up through the snow and uncover his face. Three minutes is precious time in such a situation…it might have been the difference between life and death. How is it possible that neither of the other two helped in this effort to clear the snow from his body? Why were they simply watching you freeze your hands off and why were you not equipped to go on such a trek? Taking rookies into the backcountry is not only stupid it’s reckless! I can’t even watch this again…it’s made me sick to my stomach for some reason.

    Reply
  103. Mike says:

    What is the deal with not having his own gear. Not checking for hangfire. Not being able to do anything right. Wow

    Reply
  104. DCF says:

    I want to join in with those that are applauding Emmet for posting. It’s easy to be a back seat expert, but things fall apart quickly in the real world. I’m saddened by the number of a$$holes posting such nasty comments. We all need to learn from each other.

    Reply
  105. Jordan says:

    Fucking retards! He could have died in the amount of time it took that guy to get mobilized. These people should be ashamed.

    …analogy: Guy is on fire – Let’s just wait around and do a bunch of unnecessary bullshit for more than two full minutes before we try to put him out. Retards.

    Reply
  106. S-curvy says:

    @DCF, good comment. It leaves me guessing that all the flamers are armchair quarterbacking this because they lack the experience of having made consequential mistakes themselves, and then kinda foolishly assuming that just because they haven’t made these kind of mistakes, that means they are somehow better than these guys (in training and equipment they may well be). Or that without any real test of their own skills, they would somehow have not made similar mistakes. I suspect that anyone who has been through something like this experience would not be so quick to judge.

    Reply
  107. Anonymous says:

    wow that has gotta be a fuckin joke

    Reply

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