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Will the 2013 – 2014 winer weather be full of cold weather and snowstorms?

Does nature know what’s in store for the 2013-2014 winter? Some people believe that nature has a way of telling us if a harsh winter is just around the corner. They turn to the behavior of plants and animals to determine how much wood will need to be chopped or if this is the winter to buy a snowblower. There are countless ‘Old Wives Tales’ that have been past down from generation to generation to help determine the veracity of a approaching winter. Here are 20 of the more widely known indicators.

20 Earthly Signs of a Harsh Winter Ahead

  1. Thicker than normal corn husks
  2. Woodpeckers sharing a tree
  3. Early arrival of the Snowy owl
  4. Early departure of geese and ducks
  5. Early migration of the Monarch butterfly
  6. Thick hair on the nape (back) of the cow’s neck
  7. Heavy and numerous fogs during August
  8. Raccoons with thick tails and bright bands
  9. Mice eating ravenously into the home
  10. Early arrival of crickets on the hearth
  11. Spiders spinning larger than usual webs and entering the house in great numbers
  12. Pigs gathering sticks
  13. Insects marching a bee line rather than meandering
  14. Early seclusion of bees within the hive
  15. Unusual abundance of acorns
  16. Muskrats burrowing holes high on the river hank
  17. “See how high the hornet’s nest, ‘twill tell how high the snow will rest”
  18. Narrow orange band in the middle of the Woollybear caterpillar warns of heavy snow
  19. The squirrel gathers nuts early to fortify against a hard winter
  20. Frequent halos or rings around sun or moon forecast numerous snow falls.

How do you predict a harsh winter ahead?

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40 Comments

  1. Scott_H says:

    Where is the river hank?

    Reply
  2. frankcolder says:

    are any of these points looking hopeful yet?

    Reply
    • zki89 says:

      I saw Canada Geese flying through the central valley just this last week. How is it that Animals can tell *if this is even true* and with all our science its still a crap shoot?

      Reply
      • DebR says:

        Our geese and ducks never leave the Rogue Valley. They used to, but now they hang around all winter. Plenty of wet , unfrozen ponds and fast food!

        Reply
  3. sizzle says:

    I’ve been measuring corn husks and petting lots of cows lately. Results are still inconclusive.

    Reply
  4. this guy and all of you says:

    Masterbating, more then normal in August while checking out unofficalnetwork

    Reply
  5. a person says:

    #7…Anyone been to Colorado recently? yes!

    Reply
  6. First week of August says:

    Isn’t this the same post from last season? Just changed the Years?

    Reply
  7. Keeping those fingers crossed, it could be a good year!

    Reply
  8. steve says:

    heavy and numerous FROGS during August….have seen a few normal sized FROGS so far

    Reply
  9. Beeker says:

    My pigs have been gathering sticks and my woolybear caterpillars are orange as can be. Bring it.

    Reply
  10. twerk'd says:

    The increase of homemade twerking vids on youtoob portends the downfall of not only mankind but also of copious amounts of snow. Probably in Buffalo…

    Reply
  11. PiLmo says:

    All the High Sierra street hookers in Mammoth got extra fat on their titties, ass, & thighs! A true sign that Mother Nature gonna bring the dumps!

    Reply
  12. Monika Liedl says:

    How abundant the berries are on the mountain ash trees, or the chokecherry trees.

    Reply
  13. Anonymous says:

    We are in Ca. An I have notice bull frogs that’s weird wow I have seen yhe cicrle around y he moon a little early an told my husband said I was crazy an I ssif just wait itd getting cold to early

    Reply
  14. bein reel says:

    give it up already. what will happen will happen. one thing for sure, you will all bith=ch about KSL and long lines at KT. GET a LIFE

    Reply
  15. schmeisk says:

    What about the amount of green fir cones from this season’s growth? That is some heavy reproductive investment, since firs rely upon cold temperatures in the seed bed for germination the following spring.

    Reply
  16. Past down? I think you mean passed down. Jeebus, do you guys edit ever? Maybe hiring someone (read: me) with a couple of college degrees would help.

    Reply
  17. Matthew Barr says:

    By checking the flights to see if they are more expensive than past year’s seasons

    Reply
  18. VTskier says:

    by how early the first issue of Powder arrived and how early ski porn trailers are released. oh wait, that’s just the industry jones’in meter. nevermind.

    Reply
  19. Kathryn says:

    I’m in Alaska and don’t have any of those animals around. Should I ask a bear or wolf? If we don’t have snow, THAN I’ll know something is not right. If we have a lot of snow…..that’s pretty much normal….depending if our waters are warming or not.
    Corn husks and caterpillars and cows are rare here!! ;+)

    Reply
  20. ryan floyd says:

    Mr Cheezle knows the sign of a good winter to come.

    Reply
  21. ScottishYankee says:

    My grandmother read Persimmon seeds.
    Take the seed, cut it in half and you will see 1 of 3 utensils.

    Fork: mild winter
    Spoon: heavy wet snow spoon=shovel
    Knife: icy, bitter cold (knife=cutting, and the bitter wind will “cut” through you)

    Reply
  22. Ian says:

    8/12/13, 21:35; Livermore, CA. Out walking the dog tonight and watched a flock of geese v-ing their way south — never seen them this early. my wife’s workplace has a large walnut tree overhanging the roof; crows and squirrels are working that tree like there’s no tomorrow…

    Reply
  23. Parker says:

    Flocks of blackbirds have shown up in Oklahoma usually they are not here until at least late September or October

    Reply
  24. mouthyone says:

    My girlfriend has been swallowing every time, this is highly unusual and leads me to believe that she is taking in extra calories in preperation for a harsh winter.

    Reply
  25. ZSWADE says:

    I’ve seen Sasquatch gathering more dead bodies every day…bring it on Mother Nature.

    Reply
  26. Ryan says:

    It would be sweet if the heavy fog thing in August meant lots of fluffy stuff, 2-3 days a week of heavy fog in August here in northern BC

    Reply
  27. Dean says:

    #18 on the list…. “very” narrow orange band.

    Reply

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  1. 20 SIGNS OF A SNOWY WINTER IN 2014 | COLDSMOKE
  2. 2014 Farmers Almanac Winter Weather Forecast Map

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